Textile Mill Abandoned

I visited an abandoned textile mill in North Carolina, recently.

The mill, shut decades ago, stands as a symbol of how our economy is in continual flux as it struggles to adapt within the global marketplace.

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Textile production and processing began in the Southeastern United States in the late 19th century. By 1923, more than 84,000 textile workers were employed at more than 350 mills across North Carolina.

 

By the 1950s, North Carolina had become the preeminent textile producing state, ranking #1 in virtually every industry category.

This one once processed cotton.
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The industry reached its peak in 1992 when textile production represented 16 percent of total manufacturing output, as compared to the U.S. average of just over two percent of total manufacturing in textiles.
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In 1996, there were 2,153 textile and apparel plants in North Carolina employing 233,715 people.
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But, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people employed in textile manufacturing in the state from 2004 to 2011 fell by nearly 6,000.  Total employment today stands at around 80,000.
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Today, there are mills which have survived the changes through competitive pricing models and technological innovations.We can only hope that our economy continues to adjust and meet the needs of its people as it walks into 2016.
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KidZnotes of Durham in Holiday concert, part of global program supporting in need children

KidZNotes is holding a Holiday concert this Saturday, December 17th,  on the heels of a new partnership forged with the North Carolina Symphony. The concert coincides this month with performances by in-need children from organizations inspired by the world-renown El Sistema program in seven U.S. cities and 25 countries worldwide.

When: Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011, 10:30 am
Where: Auditorium, Holton Career and Resource Center, 401 N. Driver St., Durham, N.C.
What: KidZnotes Holiday concert of 110 students, grades K-4, performing holiday favorites, sing-a-longs, and showcasing their talents.

(courtesy, MetroNC)

The Venezuelan-borne El Sistema program uses the transformational power of classical music to help build new futures for children, targeting those who would otherwise be blocked by economic and social barriers. El Sistema graduates include Gustavo Dudamel, 30-year-old virtuoso conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The El Sistema program and those inspired by it have helped nearly 1 million children to date.

Duke University donates instruments to KidZNotes, and additional sponsors include Durham Public Schools, Durham Parks and Recreation, the Durham Arts Council, and the East Durham Children’s Initiative.

Established last year in East Durham, KidZNotes targets students from four low-income schools in Durham. They receive 10 hours of free music instruction each week. On Saturdays, the students come together for large ensembles and group instruction.

Katie Wyatt (courtesy, Durham Magazine)

KidZNotes Executive Director and close friend of Dudamel, Kathryn (Katie) Wyatt, said the Holiday Concert is a great way to celebrate the season and show how people and local businesses can come together to strengthen a community and turn Durham into a world-class city.

“Kidznotes is not just music for social change for children, it’s also about the business community,” Wyatt said. “It’s about encouraging the business community to get behind its neighborhoods to foster an environment of social and economic growth.”